Music in Pilates Classes

Episode 25

This episode is the third installment of our series exploring the role of music in pilates classes. Our first episode focused on the benefits of including music in your classes, while the second installment covered all the reasons why you shouldn’t incorporate music into your teaching structure. During this conversation, we talk about both!

Our primary goal is to create a space that is best for your clients and yourself and that supports you as you thrive as a teacher. Tune in as we discuss the legal, ethical, and experiential aspects of including a musical element in the classes that you teach.

At the heart of our conversation is a vision to see every practitioner make considered decisions about every aspect of the pilates experience as we bring movement to more people. Thanks for listening! 

Key Points From This Episode:

  • An introduction to the third part of our series on whether or not music should be used in a Pilates class.
  • The primary goal of a practitioner: to create a space that is supportive for yourself and your clients.
  • What to consider when deciding whether or not to include music in the class.
  • How your musical choices can help you to develop a new client base.
  • Including a line about your musical choices in your class description.
  • Where dissonance arises: when the experience is not clear from the beginning.
  • Observation from Hannah’s Instagram poll.
  • Empowering clients by giving them the choice. 
  • How music can influence a teacher’s experience.
  • Considerations to bear in mind if you choose to include music in your class.
  • Defining copyright and the surrounding law.
  • Why paying for your Spotify account is not the same thing as paying to use music for public classes.
  • What it means to use music that exists in the public domain. 
  • The difference between royalty-free and copyright-free music. 
  • How to navigate ethical use of music. 
  • Legal and ethical musical use in pilates classes.
  • The root of this conversation: make sure that every aspect of the class experience is a decision you have made. 

EPISODE 24

 

HT: Having moments of silence where people get to just figure things out for themselves and they don’t need to compete. Their brains don’t need to compete with other influences. So, whether it’s me talking or the music in the background, they really get to focus only on themselves. I think that is a gift.”

 

[INTRODUCTION]

 

[0:00:27] HT: Welcome. Stick around if you want to learn about the art and philosophy of beautiful movement mixed with evidence-based exercise science. We’ll be having tough and inspiring conversations with other coaches, experts, artists, and athletes. Our goal is to challenge myths, explore concepts, and engage in healthy debate as we dive deep with intrigue and curiosity. 

 

I’m your host, Hannah Teutscher. I’ve been teaching dance, Pilates, and yoga for over two decades. What I’ve learned is that movement can be the joy that integrates us all together. When we can trust and express ourselves through our bodies, we are unlimited in our ability to change ourselves and our communities for the better. We, as movement teachers and coaches, have the power to help people experience this for themselves. Okay, everyone, let’s dive in. Exchanging ideas and changing people’s lives one session at a time. This is the Pilates Exchange. 

 

[EPISODE]

 

[0:01:25] HT: Welcome back to part two of our three-part series about music. This one is about, why you shouldn’t use music for a Pilates class. Now there’s a lot of polarisation in our industry in general, but I really would really would like to just go through some of the reasons why I really believe you shouldn’t be using music for these classes. One major reason would be just our lives are so busy. 

 

Our lives are so filled with noise. From the time we wake up until the time we go to sleep at night. I’m not just talking about like audible noises, but the entire cacophony of human-created stimulus, like it just fills our days from the screens, to the sounds, to the beeping, to the watches, everything around us. These moments of real quiet absences of extra input, like that’s just not happening in our day. We have the opportunity to provide, in our Pilates classes, a time of silence, of introspection in between our cues. It’s so rare. It’s so beautiful, and I really think that we should honour that type of silence, to be present and alone with your thoughts. Maybe the only sound that’s happening is the clang of the springs. Okay, and that’s fine or maybe it’s maybe it’s only the rhythm of the breath. Without music, you can really hear the sound of the breath, the quality of the breath. If we’re adding layers of music on top of it, we’re going to lose that. 

 

Silence brings renewing. It brings maybe settle, like settling into the stillness. You could be, I don’t know, having moments of clarity in silence, much more so than if you have music around. Some other reasons why you shouldn’t use music for a Pilates class. I’ve been to classes where it is so loud. You literally cannot hear the teacher. Even if the teacher has a microphone on in the music, like there’s lyrics going on, you can’t hear the teacher, they’re competing for attention, the performers are clanging around, and you can’t hear the instructions. If you’re constantly having to look up and try to figure out what the instructor is talking about, how is that good teaching? 

 

Music sometimes, unless it’s a very well-curated playlist, music doesn’t fit the timing of the exercise. Pilates isn’t known for being it’s musical in its own way, but it doesn’t fit normal, I would say, rhythms of like our music the 4/4 time that we would normally do. It has its own type of rhythm. If we layer music on it, it takes away from our own body rhythms that are in there. The type of music genre can just be annoying. 

 

I mean, not everyone has the same musical taste, right? So, like, oh gosh. There can be some really annoying music in there. If you’re just going to get clarity in your body, clarity in your movement, get a good workout on, and you are faced with a music genre that you hate. Well, it feels insulting to pay for that class, music because of its – I mean, we’ve touched on this in part one, music has the ability to play with our emotions. While that can be good, it could be really triggering for some people, depending on what their memories are or their relationship to the piece of music as people can easily slip into rumination. They could be into a place, a really dark place in their lives, depending on the music that’s happening. That’s definitely not our – I can’t say for everyone, but that’s not what my intention is in my classes to be bringing people maybe into a dark, melancholic place or triggering memories that are painful. I hope that I don’t do that in my classes. 

 

Another thing that I think we need to be aware of is how the rhythm is affecting the movements. I mean, I talked just a second ago about how our body has our own rhythm of moving. It’s like, I would call it body time. Each individual body has its own timing that it likes to move. Then you have the agenda of the teacher. The teacher will then have it’s that person’s way of cueing, whatever that exercise is. The exercise itself, just because of the way it is, has its own rhythm as well. Then if you add a rhythm, especially a syncopated rhythm from the music, it could be really jarring for some people. I’m speaking for myself. 

 

Another reason why I think that we need to be not using music is that not everyone has the same musical taste. I said that a second ago, like sometimes it’s annoying, but it’s the same musical taste. It depends on also some musical genres are more revered in different places in the world than others. I mean, just in our physical studio here in Nuremberg, Germany. We have over 20 countries represented of our clients in our physical studio. That’s a lot of different places. 

 

Six of us, all six teachers that I have right now, are all from different countries. We speak a combined language of – combined, I think eight languages altogether. I have to check out. That’s a lot of influences. We have one teacher from one country decides that this is the type of music that I really enjoy, and it might not be jelling with the rest of the clients that are taking the class. 

 

One time I was in Japan, and I was taking a, I think it was a hip-hop class. I don’t really remember. It doesn’t really matter. I’m not easily offended. Really. It sounds like I am. I really am not easily offended by many things, but I was taking this class and the teacher and the students around, obviously were not understanding the lyrics that were being sung in the songs in that class. I have never in my life have heard so many cuss words. 

 

Again, I have no problem with profanity, but the way that the artists that they chose were talking about women’s bodies, the words that they were choosing, the acts that they were doing, it was despicable. It was so crazy, because it was a complete juxtaposition to what was happening in the class. Everyone was great. It was such a fun class, except for the music. I could barely even concentrate on what was the movement that I was supposed to be doing, because the lyrics were like – I’m not going to go into it, but it was despicable. 

 

After class, I did tell the teacher, “Hey, maybe you want to find some other music. I don’t think you don’t understand what they’re saying.” But that could easily happen to anyone if you’re not very familiar with what those lyrics are in the background. The other thing, lyrics, besides them being offensive, when there’s spoken words singing, that might be competing to your cues. They might, your students might not be able to hear what you’re saying. 

 

[MESSAGE]

 

[0:09:09] HT: When I started teaching, I felt underprepared and overwhelmed. I needed to learn how to plan my training so that it made sense, but I wasn’t sure what was working and what wasn’t. So many teacher training programmes leave out the actual art and business of teaching. This is why we created Train the Trainers. 

 

Train the Trainers is designed to give you the tools you need to create a powerful learning environment for your students. Gain access to the vault of our collected knowledge where you can learn everything, we have to teach you, whether you are a freelance teacher or a studio owner. Get constructive feedback on your teaching with actionable tools you can apply immediately. We can’t wait to be part of your teaching journey and to help you grow in your business. Welcome to Train the Trainers. 

 

[END OF MESSAGE]

 

[0:09:57] HT: Let’s go back to this idea of the artists using, whatever words that they’re using. There’s that aspect of it, like the actual content being what it is. Then we have this whole other issue of, there’s artists out there. They’re convicted felons. R. Kelly, let’s just talk about him. R. Kelly’s music is still available on Spotify. They’re not like streaming it on radio. I don’t think so anymore, but as of yesterday, you could still find all R. Kelly’s playlists on Spotify. Unless you know what a dirtbag that dude is and why he’s in jail, you might not understand how maybe we shouldn’t be supporting him by playing his music in our classes. 

 

Another idea of just from me, like as I would say, I’m a recovering dancer. As a former dancer, my body just unconsciously starts to do things in the count of the music. Not only was I a dancer, but my father plays bass. I have such a strong rhythm feeling, because I grew up with him playing bass and metronomes and like music in my entire life. When I hear music, it doesn’t matter what it is, I have to make a conscious effort not to move with it, because my body will move with the music. Nothing takes me out of my movement practice more than having either music that I don’t relate to, or crappy music, or music that just doesn’t fit to that movement. 

 

I understand that maybe that is a really deeply personal thing. As I was thinking about this, imagine them say like you’re not a dancer, you’re a hairdresser. Actually, I’m thinking about my hairdresser. The owner has the same playlist on every single day in her work. Every day, the same playlist, she has to listen to the same songs over and over and over this hairdresser. For her to have the opportunity of not listening to music would be such a gift. 

 

There’s a lot of people that have jobs where they are forced to listen to music. It’s not just the dancers. It’s maybe someone is a server in a restaurant and the music, the playlists are always the same. Maybe it is a curated playlist for them, but often it’s going to be repeating over and over. Giving an opportunity to be free from that, free from that they must be listening to music, because of our relationship to the [inaudible 0:12:48] in Nuremberg, so we are used to dance at the theatre here in Nuremberg, because of that, we have many, they have a full orchestra, full opera, many musicians that are on staff over there. We do have Pilates classes for them. 

 

Also, for them having, when your life is music, having that freedom to not have music is so important. The freedom to listen to just noises. The noises that are in the room, other people breathing, for example, your own breath, listening to say, rolling back or rolling like a ball, where how your body is making contact to the floor. You could only hear that if it’s silent. Those subtle sounds are going to be bulldozed over with the music piece.

 

It doesn’t matter which one that is. To go back to our musicians, so the ones that we work with it’s not even, it’s picking out the musical genre that would work for them, like maybe you think, oh, classical music, that’ll be nice, but you put on a couple of nocturnes from Chopin. Those are so, oh gosh. It could be like psychological poison sometimes. They’re so unhappy. They’re so melancholic. That we don’t want that grief, and distress, and agony, and despair in our classes, even though it’s beautiful music. For those musicians, they study all this music. They’re going to also have not only the transportation of those emotions, but they understand the history of each piece of music of its classical music that we go in, that we’re using in our classes. 

 

We touched on last week how music can override that physical fatigue, that you’re no longer paying attention to those physical cues of being a little bit tired. So last week, we talked about how that’s a good thing, right? It can help you push further than what you had maybe had intended on doing in that workout. Because of the power of some music, the body can no longer sometimes recognise that extreme exertion, the rising levels of lactate in the muscles that your heart is beating out of your chest. 

 

Sometimes, we’re going so hard with that music that it’s competing with that physiological feedback, while it can be good to get that little bit of that extra few percentage out. It can also be equally as damaging when we’re not paying attention to how tired we are. What is my breathing? Am I feeling agitated? Am I feeling – maybe not agitated emotionally, but agitated physically? How do my joints feel? How to do those muscles feel? Am I working in an alignment that feels right and efficient for me, or am I just trying to power through? 

 

As that musical landscape, let’s say, overpowers our physical cues, and maybe even supporting to go further – I mean, I don’t have any studies to say either way, but I’m just noticing from myself. It can bring us a little bit too far. I think we need to be cognisant of that as well when we’re saying, “Hey, we really need to be teaching classes without music.” I think for each one of these reasons, you may identify with one a little bit more than the other, but for me personally, it’s that silence is so golden. It’s such a gift to be able to give. 

 

It’s not just in the music that’s in the background or more present or the playlist or whatever. It’s also in our cueing, which we’ve talked about before on this podcast when I’m sure we’ll talk about it again, because I feel strongly about it, but having moments of silence where people get to just figure things out for themselves, and they don’t need to compete. Their brains don’t need to compete with other influences. So, whether it’s me talking or the music in the background, that they really get to focus only on themselves. I think that is a gift that is really a beautiful thing that we can offer them. I hope with this second series of three, I’ve given you some ideas of why not to use music. 

 

Now, I’m sure you’re probably thinking, well, what are you going to do in the third part? Great question. Part three is going to be considerations you need to have before you decide to use music for your classes. I’ve given you pros. I’ve given you cons. I’d like to offer you some ways that you can integrate music into your classes that it is not going to be legal advice, but of things that you really do need to be paying attention to. Why I believe that these choices of whether to use music or not to use music are deeply personal for you as the teacher. 

 

Of course, you need to be clarified that with the studio that you’re teaching that there is room for both of them in the Pilates world. It’s not just yes, music or no music, but it is a continuum and that there’s room for all of us, because we are going to be, people are going to identify themselves in different classes. They’re going to say, this is my class, because you’re using heavy metal music. I love heavy metal and like I would have never do Pilates any other way, except for listening to heavy metal now. There’s a lot of opportunity that’s in there, for example. So, I’d like to go into that next week, talking about the authenticity of you as a teacher, what brings you joy, legal considerations, and thinking about your audience. With that, I will see you next week. Have a wonderful, wonderful day. 

 

[OUTRO]

 

[0:19:15] HT: Thank you so much for joining us today. I hope you enjoyed the conversation. A great cost-free way of supporting us and the podcast would be to give us a five-star rating. You could also look down into the show notes and grab any one of the free resources for teachers. I hope to see you next week on The Pilates Exchange. Happy teaching everyone.

 

[END]

EPISODE 25

 

HT: Having that musical support might make you feel more comfortable in your teaching too. Like that might just bring out that extra little bit of authenticity in your classes where you feel like you could really shine.”

 

[INTRODUCTION] 

 

[0:00:20] HT: Welcome. Stick around if you want to learn about the art and philosophy of beautiful movement mixed with evidence-based exercise science. We’ll be having tough and inspiring conversations with other coaches, experts, artists, and athletes. Our goal is to challenge myths, explore concepts, and engage in healthy debate, as we dive deep with intrigue and curiosity. 

 

I’m your host, Hannah Teutscher. I’ve been teaching dance, Pilates, and yoga for over two decades. What I’ve learned is that movement can be the joy that integrates us all together. When we can trust and express ourselves through our bodies, we are unlimited in our ability to change ourselves and our communities for the better. We, as movement teachers and coaches have the power to help people experience this for themselves. Okay, everyone, let’s dive in. Exchanging ideas and changing people’s lives one session at a time. This is The Pilates Exchange. 

 

[EPISODE]

 

[0:01:17] HT: Welcome back everyone to The Pilates Exchange for part three of everything Music. Now, I want to preface this by saying I am not a lawyer in this area. This is by no means any sort of legal advice. There’s a lot of different bodies, governing bodies that you need to be aware of that are pertaining to your particular situation. I’m going to link in my website. I will link to all of those, because I think that would be a good resource for you. Let us backtrack. Part one of this series, I said, everyone should be using music in your Pilates classes. Part two, I went into all the reasons why I don’t think you should be using music. And part three is really about, both of those being true.

What do I mean? I think, generally, we need to give ourselves more room, give ourselves, and give each other a little bit more room to create spaces that are going to be the best for our clients. Not only just the best for your clients, but the best for you, how do you thrive in your teaching. I’d like to make the case for each one of us is so individual, how they like to teach, how the clients that you’re interacting with. It would better serve you to have the information of why you would like to, why you don’t like to, or wouldn’t want to, and make a good decision, somewhere between the two. Because there is no clear, yes, you should and no, you shouldn’t. I hope that came through in the previous two podcasts. 

 

Things that I’d like you to consider is, what is your audience? What are the clientele that are making up your classes? Would they benefit from a little bit more silence and from the music? How would you create a space where it is respectful of people’s needs? One idea would be, if you decided to work with music, you might want to already have that in the class description. You might already want to say, “Okay, this class has soft background music,” so that they already know what they’re going into, or pop music, or “Hey, punk fans, this is the Pilates class of your dreams.”

 

You might be able to, through your musical choices, really niche out a place in the market that generates a new public for your classes, for your business. That might be a very wise business decision, actually. Because we want to pick up people into the joy of movement wherever they’re at. So if they’re like – if they love a certain type of music, and that’s the same love that you have, why not offer that? We’ll get into a few of that, how to do that in just a few minutes.

 

Equally, you could also, in your class description, say something about this class is going to be conducted without the use of music so you can really concentrate on mindfulness or the silence or listening to your breath. That might be exactly what people are looking for. I think where we come into dissonance is where it’s not clear for the client or the potential client, what the experience is going to be for them. Having that in your wording might save them a little bit. It might attract them to the class. It also might save them a little bit of disappointment if it is not what they expected. I like everything with clear expectations. I find, that’s awesome. 

 

What I found interesting, I did a very unofficial poll. Thank you, Instagram. Very unofficial poll. I really thank everyone that participated in that. I was asking, does music belong in a Pilates class? Seventy-seven percent of people said it does, and 33% said no. What I found really interesting in the private conversations that I was having with teachers is that, often, what they would do for their own practice is different than what they did in their teaching practice. This is again, this is not a study of it, it was just an observation. A lot of people, if their teachers had preferred teaching with music, they enjoy practising in silence. Just found that it was it or opposite. I just found that to be an interesting observation. 

 

At 77% of people enjoying music in your classes, that’s actually quite a large number, I would say. Yes. But clearly, labelling the class with the music or even the vibe, maybe if it’s not exactly what music you’re going to be using. But the vibe that’s there would be, yes, I think that’s good. For us, we try to do that, but we also are – like in a personal training, we’re allowing the client, if they want to listen to music, to pick that vibe that they would like that they feel would be motivating for them. We have definitely clients that are silent only, and you could hear a pin drop in the room, and that’s what they need to really focus on themselves and get to their goals. We have other people that would rather have something going on just in the background, just enough to take the tension off, is what they have described them. There’s other people that really like a more present, be in the class. For them, that’s energising.

 

The previous podcasts, we’ve talked about why that could be for those people. But being open to what your person needs in front of you is also really powerful, giving them the choice to have a say in what’s happening in that experience, if possible. If you’re teaching a huge class of a lot of people, everyone’s going to have a different choice in there. Maybe it’s just – maybe not everyone gets to pick the musical accompaniment when it’s a group class. But definitely in a personal training, that might be something to consider.

 

I also want to make the, I don’t know if it’s really making a point. But I’d like to sort of accentuate the idea that if you’re a music lover, and you’re a teacher, having that musical support might make you feel more comfortable in your teaching too. That might just bring out that extra little bit of authenticity in your classes where you feel like you could really shine. Everyone’s a hero in their own story. How is that soundtrack supporting your, you know, that idea of a movie? How is that soundtrack supporting your class, as you the hero, and also them, the hero? 

 

But as the teacher, like bringing out that authenticity, if you’re really vibing with that music and really super enjoying it. I’m not talking about like singing along the entire class. I’m not talking about distracting your intention in the class. Having that with you, it might be the way for you to calm down if you’re a little bit more of a nervous teacher, or feel more grounded, or feel more energised, or whatever that is. And when you were doing your best as a teacher, you’re able to offer more and be more generous with your information.

 

Now, if you do decide to work with music, I think there’s some tricky things that you need to be thinking about that, maybe we could get a – if you’re a lawyer, and you know about this, please contact me. I’ll have you on and we could just really discuss bit for bit what this entails. I think movement teachers aren’t really recognising the responsibility that they have if they’ve decided to use music in their classes. It is a big, contentious issue. We’ll go into just a little bits of this. But licensing, licensing is one thing. Each country has its own performing rights organisations, that collects royalties from the businesses that are playing those songs, and it distributes to the artists, the composers, any other relevant people or parties.

 

There’s licensing for different music. That’s going to be depending on the regulations of your region. And there might even be more licensing agencies, like several that you need to comply with, depending on what country you’re in. I see a lot of these Facebook groups about, “Oh! Well, this is the answer for everything. Oh, you just got to pay over here.” It’s not that simple. You really need to do the research for where you are teaching.

 

[MESSAGE]

 

[0:09:43] HT: When I started teaching, I felt underprepared and overwhelmed. I needed to learn how to plan my training so that it made sense, but I wasn’t sure what was working and what wasn’t. So many teacher training programmes leave out the actual art and business of teaching. This is why we created Train the Trainers. 

 

Train the Trainers is designed to give you the tools you need to create a powerful learning environment for your students. Gain access to the vault of our collected knowledge where you can learn everything, we have to teach you, whether you are a freelance teacher or a studio owner. Get constructive feedback on your teaching with actionable tools you can apply immediately. We can’t wait to be part of your teaching journey and to help you grow in your business. Welcome to Train the Trainers. 

 

[END OF MESSAGE]

 

[0:10:31] HT: We also have the issue of copyright. What is that? Music copyright is a set of rights granted by the country’s government for the intellectual property, because music is intellectual property. Someone thought it up and created it. As the owner of the music, that copyright gives the musician the right to make it, to sell it, to distribute it. That’s how people are earning their livings, just like we are earning our living from teaching classes. They get a right, they have the right to make a living from the music that they are producing, depending on who’s owning the copyright. There might be different limitations and how it’s being publicly performed, or how it’s displayed. 

 

Here’s the funny thing, is that music streaming services like, let’s just take a big one like Spotify, because most people know that. Even if you’re paying for it, for that – you’re not paying to put it in a class, you’re paying so that you can listen to it, that you can stream it. Not to make it a public service. That paying for the Spotify does not allow you to be playing music in your studio, your gym, your fitness centre, in your classes. That is something else entirely. I think there’s a real misconception there.

 

Paying for your pro version of Spotify isn’t doing that. I know people take issue with Spotify, and they should, but we’re not going to do that in this podcast because they are not paying their artists appropriately. That’s a whole big mess. The music industry has a lot of stuff going on, and I’m not going to wade into that. But you are not doing yourself any service or the musicians any service by the few euros or dollars that you’re paying for your monthly Spotify subscription. It’s not paying the artists and it’s also not paying the licensing that you would need for your classes.

 

I think that is something that you need to be very aware of, because if you’re not paying attention to what the government wants, or those other agencies, those other organisations that want to cut of the pie to fee, so that the musicians can put food on their table. You run into the potential of being fined, like a lot of money. That is not something what you want to do, because that would be illegal. Then, there’s the other idea of using music only that’s in the public domain. What is that? Public domain music, those are songs that are not protected by copyright and can be used without permission and payment. You could use all of your music from public domain sources. The length of the copyright protection, like that is also different country to country. Music, along with like other creative works, but it’s generally going to be in the public domain about 50 to 75 years after the death of the creator.

 

For example, all historical musical works, pre-1929, those are all public domain. So you can use that music, and there’s special websites that you can take music from there. That being said, there might be limitations on that, depending on who has recorded the music. If you are listening to one of the great orchestras of the world, like say, Cleveland Orchestra or London Philharmonic. Those are recordings that might not be in public domain, even though the music is in public domain.

 

So you see, it’s a very, very complicated thing right there, that I just want you as the teacher, or the studio owner, and just to be aware of them. Then, we have royalty free music. That is not the same as copyright-free. Royalty-free music is, music you could use in content without paying royalties to the artists or right holders every time it’s played. Royalty-free music would come into play like if you have a YouTube channel, and you have music that’s accompanying your classes. That should be royalty-free. Or you’re paying a subscription that works for the digital space or your class space. Because, again, those licensing agencies have the right to take away the music if it is not royalty free, or if you’re not paying for it in the right way.

 

You cannot have a Spotify list stream that do your class to it, and then put it on YouTube. That’s not going to work, because someone else owns the right to that music. Namely the artists and the publishing house of the music. We do have organisations that you could pay a subscription to, that covers most of this. The one that we’ve been using for several years now that we love Epidemic Sound, they work with the artist, and they produce a lot of original music. We believe that this is ethical because their musical creators get paid. That’s something we’re sure of. Chris and I do a lot of research, anytime we’re going to be partnering with any sort of company at all, because we want to make sure that it fits our ethical standards.

 

This is one that we’ve been using, we love them. You’ll find their music from content creators in all of our stuff that’s going to be on YouTube, or our podcast intro, also on Instagram. That’s the music we use, because we’re paying a subscription for him. I will link that into my show notes so that you could have a listen to that. There is a link with an affiliate link, because we love them, we’ve tried them out. If that’s something that you decide, go through that link, that would help us. We might get a couple cents from it, if anything.

 

If you did decide to go that way, I can also pass along my because I have playlists that I’ve created for my classes. If that’s interesting to you, just reach out and I can send over some playlists that we’ve been doing on Epidemic Sound. In any case, back to these agencies, the licensing agencies.

 

I couldn’t find all of them. There’s a lot of countries out there, my friends. But I’m going to link to some of the big agencies that you can contact to see if you are covered with, say, Epidemic Sound, or if what you are currently doing is covered by them. Some of these agencies like whether it’s ASCAP in the United States, or BMI, or a GAMA here in Germany, I think Australia has Musical Rights of Australia. Every country has its own thing. You can contact them directly and see what you need to do to be covered.

 

Sometimes it is that you need to be paying a small fee to be in protecting yourself, and that small fee is then getting collected by these agencies, and then distributed back to the musicians as a collective. But each agency, it’s worth it to go check it out, because you don’t want to be ending up on the wrong side of these agencies. So I just find that as a very, very important aspect of it. Because we want to use music, that’s effectively that’s going to power your classes, but also legally. Then, there’s that ethical part of it. I hope that makes sense.

 

A lot of ideas over the past few weeks. I’m sure I’ve missed some. That’s always the nature of it. If you’d like me to do a follow up, or you have contact with a lawyer that would like to go a little bit deeper with what we could do to be protecting ourselves, then send him over my way. I think that that would be great to get them involved as well. So again, this is not legal advice at all from my side. It’s just things that you need to be cautious about, aware of, so that at the end, you are making decisions. I think that’s what it is. It’s always a decision what you’re doing, a thoughtful, mindful decision. How you’re teaching your classes, how do you want that atmosphere, what is the experience that you’re giving to your clients? And doing in a way that protects you from legal repercussions, in a way that benefits you if you have a studio, in a way that you could connect with new clientele, niche out, and in the end, bring movement to more people.

 

With that, I will leave you. I’m wishing you a wonderful rest of your week wherever you are. I will see you next week. Thanks so much. 

 

[OUTRO]

 

[0:19:09] HT: Thank you so much for joining us today. I hope you enjoyed the conversation. A great cost-free way of supporting us and the podcast would be to give us a five-star rating. You could also look down into the show notes and grab any one of the free resources for teachers. I hope to see you next week on The Pilates Exchange. Happy teaching, everyone.

 

[END]

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